Search Results for duty and danger

Dissension, Tension and Succession in the House of Saud

In 1932, Saudi Arabia was established by King Abd al-Aziz and has been ruled by the Saud clan ever since. On the demise of the King, the Crown Prince assumes the throne, with a new Crown Prince traditionally appointed among the sons of Ibn Saud. However, sometimes things don’t go so smoothly. In 1954 the eldest […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Middle East Tagged |
End of an Era: The August Coup and the Final Days of the Soviet Union

In August 1991, Soviet hardliners attempted to overthrow the progressive Mikhail Gorbachev, Secretary General of the Communist Party, in a desperate attempt to save the collapsing Soviet Union. Declaring a state of emergency, eight government officials named themselves the State Committee on the State of Emergency (GKChP) and forcibly detained Gorbachev in the Crimea, where […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged |
How to Handle a Crisis – Ambassador Edition

As part of its Ambassadorial Seminar, the Foreign Service Institute gives each of the participants a copy of “This Worked for Me,” a collection of insights and best practices from recent ambassadors (thus the first-person voice throughout) to assist newly minted ambassadors on how to effectively conduct relations with their host-country counterparts while motivating and […]

The War in Bosnia and the Moral Dilemma of Refugees

The Bosnian War, which began April 5, 1992, was the result of the breakup of Yugoslavia. Pressure began to build in Bosnia-Herzegovina in February 1992 after the government passed a referendum for independence from Yugoslavia, which further exacerbated ethnic tensions in the already tense territory. Bosnian Serbs, who wished to be united in a Greater […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Consular, Europe, Human Rights, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , , , , |
Guns and Ganja: Marijuana Usage in the Foreign Service

Like many countries, the U.S. has recently grappled with the issue of how to deal with marijuana usage:  Should it be legalized or merely decriminalized? What about the use of medical marijuana? What are the human costs if possession is a felony? And what are the costs if it’s readily available? The following excerpts provide […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Consular, East Asia and Pacific, Humorous, Military, South Central Asia, Western Hemisphere Tagged , |
“Don’t Cry For Me, Argentina” — The Tumultuous Times of Juan and Evita Peron

July 26, 1952: The people of Argentina are glued to their radios and fall silent as an official broadcast comes from the Subsecretary of Information:  “It is our sad duty to inform the people of the Republic that Eva Peron, the Spiritual Leader of the Nation, died at 8:25 p.m.” The silence is broken as […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Western Hemisphere Tagged |
A Completely Lawless Place – Beirut and the Assassination of Ambassador Meloy and Robert Waring

The Lebanese Civil War was a 15-year conflict that took the lives of more than 130,000 people. Throughout the early 1970s, divisions between Christian Maronites and Palestinians began to deepen and soon escalated into all-out war. While the war was largely a struggle between these two groups, the violence soon affected the U.S. On June […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Middle East, Terrorism Tagged , , , |
Hard Rock Hotel Panama: Noriega and the U.S. Invasion, Part II

The U.S. and SOUTHCOM had spent considerable time and effort planning for the invasion and had mapped out several places where Noriega could potentially be hiding, the chief one being the house of a mistress. However, he wasn’t in any of them as he had been tipped off.  Now the U.S. military and the embassy […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Human Rights, Military, Public Diplomacy, Western Hemisphere Tagged , , |
Hard Rock Hotel Panama — Noriega and the U.S. Invasion, Part I

Beginning in the middle of the 1980s, relations between General Manuel Noriega, Panama’s de facto leader, and the United States started to deteriorate. In 1986 President Ronald Reagan pressured him with several drug-related indictments in U.S. courts; however, Noriega did not give in. As relations continued to spiral downward, Noriega shifted his allegiance towards the […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Human Rights, Military, Public Diplomacy, Western Hemisphere Tagged , |
You Know a Coup is Coming but No One will Listen: Sudan 1964

Sudan’s long history has been riddled with internal conflict. The United Kingdom and Egypt controlled Sudan for the first half of the twentieth century, then agreed to cede it self-government in 1953. In December 1955, the premier of Sudan declared unilateral independence. The newly independent Republic swiftly fell into a pattern of civil wars, coups […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Espionage, Foreign Service, Military, Post-Colonialism, Public Diplomacy Tagged , , , , , |