Search Results for new embassy

Starting an Embassy from Scratch in Papua New Guinea

In the decades following World War II, as colonies across the globe gained independence, the United States worked to establish embassies and consulates in these new nations, some in the remotest areas of the world. Papua New Guinea, which gained autonomy from Australia on September 16, 1975, was one such case. Mary Olmsted was assigned […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, East Asia and Pacific, Foreign Service, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , , |
Foreign Service Newly-Weds in 1960s Yemen

Since the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, Yemen was been a hot spot for unrest in the Middle East. The 1960s saw instability and hostile relations between the socialist South Yemen and the authoritarian Yemen Arab Republic (YAR), also known as North Yemen. The YAR was in the midst of a bloody civil war that […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Foreign Service, Middle East, Military, Post-Colonialism, Public Diplomacy, Spouses and children, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , , , |
New President, Bad Plan: the Bay of Pigs Fiasco

After Fidel Castro ousted Cuban strongman Fulgencio Batista, expropriated American economic assets and developed links with the Soviet Union, President Eisenhower authorized the CIA in March 1960 to develop a plan to overthrow Castro. The agency trained and armed Cuban exiles to carry out the attack. Shortly after his inauguration, John F. Kennedy learned of the invasion plan, concluded […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Military, Russia/Soviet Union, Western Hemisphere Tagged , , , , |
Revolutionizing Public Diplomacy: U.S. Embassy Tokyo in the 1970s

The goal of public diplomacy (PD) is defined as supporting the achievement of U.S. foreign policy goals and objectives, advancing national interests, and enhancing national security. It is done by informing and influencing foreign publics and strengthening the relationship between the people of the U.S. and citizens of the rest of the world. In Washington, […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, East Asia and Pacific, Foreign Service, Public Diplomacy Tagged |
A New Way of Teaching America’s Frontline Diplomats

The State Department invests significant resources in training its incoming consular officers. They learn through courses taught at the Foreign Service Institute (FSI) by senior consular officers using group projects and case studies, as well as field trips to airports to observe how visa holders are processed at the port of U.S. entry. Officers must pass weekly […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Consular, Foreign Service Tagged |
An Embassy in Flames: Islamabad, 1979

The November 21, 1979 attack on the American Embassy in Islamabad started as a small group demonstration in front of the embassy, where protesters shouted anti-American slogans and demanded entry into the campus. Police officers were able to stop the protesters and have them leave the area. However, about fifteen minutes later, some six busloads of Pakistani […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Military, Public Diplomacy, South Central Asia, Terrorism Tagged , , , |
“A Box Sealed for 70 years” — Opening U.S. Embassy Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

A mountainous country in Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan was ceded by China and formally incorporated into the Russian Empire in 1876. With the creation of the USSR, it became the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic until the dissolution of the USSR in 1991. After the failed August coup in Moscow, Kyrgyzstan declared independence from the Soviet Union on […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Foreign Service, Russia/Soviet Union, South Central Asia Tagged , , |
The Bombing of U.S. Embassy Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

On August 7, 1998, between 10:30 and 10:40 a.m. local time, the U.S. embassies in Nairobi , Kenya and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania were attacked in coordinated truck bombings. Approximately 212 people were killed and an estimated 4,000 wounded in Nairobi,, while the attack killed 11 individuals and wounded 85 in Dar es Salaam. The […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Terrorism, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , , , |
It’s Feng Shui or the Highway: Building the Chinese Embassy in Washington with I. M. Pei

Feng shui seeks to promote prosperity, good health, and general well-being by examining how energy, qi, (pronounced “chee”), flows through a particular room, house, building, or garden. Feng means “wind” and “shui” means water; in Chinese culture, wind and water are associated with good health so that good feng shui means good fortune, and bad […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, China, Foreign Service, Humorous Tagged , |
Naming Names: U.S. Embassy Jakarta and Indonesian Purges 1965-1966

An article by an American reporter alleged that the U.S. embassy in Jakarta played a role in the Indonesian massacres of 1965-1966 by supplying a list of known communists to Major General Suharto (seen right), whose forces then hunted them down and killed them. The violence began when Communist forces killed six of Indonesia’s senior […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Espionage, Human Rights, Military Tagged , , , |