Search Results for reagan

Note: Search results do not reflect all ADST resources. To view the full text of our oral histories, please visit our Library of Congress series, Frontline Diplomacy.

The Extra Special Relationship: Thatcher, Reagan, and the 1980s

The “special relationship” between the United States and the United Kingdom has served to unite the two nations over the past century. Thanks in part to a shared language, historically common enemies and similar political structures, leaders of the two countries have found it easier than most to achieve common objectives around the world. Perhaps […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Europe, Military, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged , , |
Nancy Reagan and the Runaway Chopper

When the First Lady of the United States comes to town, it requires almost as much planning and fanfare as a visit by the President. As First Lady, Nancy Reagan was dedicated to spreading her anti-drug message across the world, often travelling alone. As part of that effort, she and fifteen members of her entourage had […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History
When the Sudanese Autocrat Met President Reagan and Lost his Job

In 1969, Colonel Gaafar Muhammad Nimeiry (seen right), who three years earlier had graduated from the United States Army Command College in Fort Leavenworth,  overthrew the government of newly-independent Sudan and became prime minister. Once in office, Nimeiry made full use of his powers, nationalizing banks and industries and brutally eliminating his enemies; he ordered […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Cold War, Human Rights, Military Tagged , |
 Taking the Chill off the Cold War: The First Reagan-Gorbachev Summit

The Geneva Summit of 1985 was the first meeting between President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev to talk about the arms race, particularly the Strategic Defense Initiative, and to establish personal relations between the leaders of the world’s superpowers.  Held November 19, 1985 at a chateau owned by the Aga Khan, the first meeting went over […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Europe, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged , , , , |
Al Haig and the Reagan Assassination Attempt — “I’m in charge here”

When President Ronald Reagan was shot on March 30, 1981, chaos ensued behind the scenes at the White House. With no real protocol in place for such a situation, everyone involved had to improvise and hope that everything would turn out right. In an attempt to keep everyone calm, Al Haig, Reagan’s Secretary of State, […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History Tagged , , , , |
The Reagan-Gorbachev Arms Control Breakthrough

Back to Memoirs and Occasional Papers The Reagan-Gorbachev Arms Control Breakthrough:The Treaty Eliminating Intermediate-range Nuclear Force (INF) Missiles This is a collective memoir of yesteryear when the Cold War was still icy. The Reagan-Gorbachev Arms Control Breakthrough analyzes the limitation of intermediate-range nuclear force missiles from the vantage point of history, drawing primarily on the reflections of the […]

Diplomacy in Cold Blood: Fatal Encounters Around the World

An American citizen abroad accused of murder: this is a particular nightmare for consular officers. These cases can become public scandals and political quandaries, and it is the job of American Citizen Services to ensure that Americans accused of major crimes beyond U.S. borders receive appropriate treatment in accordance with international law. If an arrested […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, China, Consular, Europe, Foreign Service, Middle East Tagged , , , |
Chipping Away at Czechoslovak Communism: The Helsinki Final Act and Charter 77

The Solidarity Movement. Perestroika and Glasnost. The fall of the Berlin Wall. All of these movements, policies, or events had a tremendous influence on the dissolution of communism in Eastern Europe and the end of the Cold War. While not attributed the same attention and certainly less well known, many diplomats operating behind the Iron […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Europe, Human Rights, Military, Post-Colonialism, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged , , |
The Siberian Seven: Escaping Religious Persecution in the U.S.S.R.

From its inception, the Soviet Union became the first state in the world to actively attempt to eliminate religion from society. Religion was viewed by Soviet leadership as counter-intuitive to scientific reason and as a threat to the consolidation and exertion of state power. Correspondingly, under Soviet religious policy, tens of thousands of houses of worship […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Consular, Human Rights, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged , , , |
The 2000 Presidential Election – The Florida Recount

The presidential election of November 7, 2000 was one of the most memorable – and controversial – in the history of the United States. It pitted Republican candidate George W. Bush, then governor of Texas and son of former president George H. W. Bush (1989–1993), and Democratic candidate Al Gore, then Bill Clinton’s Vice President. […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Foreign Service, Humorous, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , |