Search Results for North Africa

Note: Search results do not reflect all ADST resources. To view the full text of our oral histories, please visit our Library of Congress series, Frontline Diplomacy.

Anatomy of an Overthrow: Why a Revered African Leader was Toppled

A council of combined security forces known as the Derg staged a coup d’état on September 12, 1974 against Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie I, arresting and imprisoning the monarch who had ruled for decades. The committee renamed itself the Provisional Military Administrative Council, took control of the government, soon abolished the monarchy and established Marxism-Leninism […]

Posted in Africa, Cold War, Human Rights, Military, Public Diplomacy, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged , , , |
The Search for Peace in Southern Africa – Oil, Angola, and the Proxy Wars

During the Cold War, the United States and the USSR engaged in a zero-sum game throughout the globe; while mutually assured destruction prevented the two nuclear superpowers from fighting a hot war, they did conduct an extensive war of proxies on nearly every continent. In the 1970s, just as Saigon – and American influence in […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Cold War, Military Tagged , , , , , , |
A Never-ending Tragedy — The Onset of the AIDS Crisis in Africa

The spread of AIDS in Africa in the 1980s and 90s presented unique challenges for U.S. diplomats suddenly faced with a public health epidemic. Not only did local hospitals and medical resources become overrun, diplomatic communities and Americans living abroad were threatened by the emergence of HIV/AIDS. While countries such as Uganda implemented crucial AIDS […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Public Diplomacy, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged |
Teaching the Foreign Service to Speak Foreign Languages

The Foreign Service Institute (FSI) is the primary training institution to prepare American diplomats to advance U.S. foreign affairs interests, teaching, among other things, the languages of the countries where Foreign Service Officers will serve. At the National Foreign Affairs Training Center in Arlington, Virginia, FSI’s School of Language Studies provides 25 hours of classroom […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Europe, Foreign Service, Post-Colonialism Tagged , |
Play it again, Anne: Casablanca’s First Female Consul General

While America was evolving into a more gender-equal society at the end of the last century, conflicts could arise when female Foreign Service officers went abroad to lead diplomatic missions in countries whose foreign contacts were not used to seeing women in positions of authority. This sometimes led to uncomfortable situations. It was the perseverance, forbearance […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Foreign Service, Middle East, Spouses and children, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged |
“How many people can you fit on a 747?”- Operations Sheba and Solomon

The Ethiopian Aliyah, as it is known in Israel, was the migration during the 1980’s of thousands of Ethiopian Jews [known in Amharic as Falashas; some consider the term pejorative] to Israel. The Israeli Defense Force (IDF) played a major role in the evacuation of the Ethiopian Jews as they came under increasing threat from […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Cold War, Espionage, Human Rights, Middle East, Military Tagged , , |
Algeria’s Struggle for Independence

The modern-day People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria is now a proud, sovereign state in North Africa that readily influences the region. However, before 1962, Algeria had been a French colony, dating back to the French invasion of Algiers in 1830. Following a brutal conquest that some termed as genocide, France began a policy of “civilizing” […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Middle East, Military Tagged , |
Martinis, Carpets and Sacks of Gold: A U.S. Diplomat in French Tunisia

Tunisia achieved independence from France after almost 75 years as a protectorate. Life under French rule was pleasant for some, including foreign diplomats. The number of French colonists grew, ultimately occupying one-fifth of the arable land of Tunisia, and the French directed the building of roads, ports and railroads, and the development of mines. But […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Europe, Foreign Service, Humorous
Death of an AUB President and Father of a Future NBA Coach

He was a brilliant scholar who focused on the Middle East and whose books were widely read by Arabists. His son Steve would later play for the NBA champion Chicago Bulls and then become coach of the Golden State Warriors and lead them to a championship in 2015 and break the record for most wins in […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Middle East, Terrorism Tagged , |
The Diplomacy of Extraditing an Alleged Terrorist

In 1973 three bombs, timed to explode with the arrival of Israeli Prime Minister Golda Meir to the U.S., were found in rental cars in New York City. The cars were parked near two Israeli banks and the El-Al cargo terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport. The explosives did not go off, but rendered fingerprints […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Europe, Middle East, Terrorism Tagged , |