Search Results for chile

Grapes of Wrath and Strained Relations with Chile

Grocery stores throughout the United States pulled tons of grapes from their shelves when traces of cyanide were found in two grapes shipped from Chile to Philadelphia on March 13, 1989. The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration advised Americans to get rid of all fruit in their homes unless they were certain it was […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Western Hemisphere Tagged |
The Chile Burn Victims Case: Containment vs. Human Rights under Pinochet

During a 1986 protest in Santiago, Chile against the human rights abuses of Augusto Pinochet’s regime, teenagers setting up barricades were arrested by a military patrol. What happened next to Rodrigo Rojas DeNegri (seen right) and Carmen Quintana is a matter of dispute, but in the end, Rojas was dead and Quintana severely burned. An […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Consular, Espionage, Human Rights, Military, Terrorism, Western Hemisphere Tagged , , , , |
Chile’s 1988 Plebiscite and the End of Pinochet’s Dictatorship

The 1970s and 1980s were a long, dark time for Chile. The September 11, 1973 coup against Socialist president Salvador Allende led to the brutal dictatorship under Commander-in-Chief Augusto Pinochet, who immediately began to round up thousands of opponents in stadiums and elsewhere and have them killed. In 1980, a new constitution was approved, which […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Human Rights, Military, Public Diplomacy, Western Hemisphere, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , |
Chile’s Coup Against Salvador Allende and the Truth Behind “Missing”

In 1973, political tensions were high in Chile, with conflict arising between the socialist President Salvador Allende and the more conservative Congress of Chile. The Chilean economy was failing, the Supreme Court had denounced Allende’s government, and perhaps more importantly, the military had lost its respect for Allende. During the summer, there had been several […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Military, Western Hemisphere Tagged , , , |
El Tanquetazo — Chile’s Coup That Wasn’t

In the early 70’s, Chile was in a state of political unrest— its socialist president Salvador Allende and largely conservative congress were at odds, and by June 1973, the Chilean Armed Forces were plotting against the Allende government. On June 29, Lt. Col. Roberto Souper led a failed coup attempt now known as El Tanquetazo. […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Humorous, Military, Western Hemisphere
The 2000 Presidential Election – The Florida Recount

The presidential election of November 7, 2000 was one of the most memorable – and controversial – in the history of the United States. It pitted Republican candidate George W. Bush, then governor of Texas and son of former president George H. W. Bush (1989–1993), and Democratic candidate Al Gore, then Bill Clinton’s Vice President. […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Foreign Service, Humorous, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , |
Regarding Henry, Protecting Nancy – On Security Detail with the Kissingers

Traditionally, Secretaries of State receive a personal protection detail from the State Department’s Diplomatic Security Service (DSS). However, Henry Kissinger eschewed the DS detail in favor of the Secret Service protection he had as the National Security Advisor at the White House. His wife Nancy, a brilliant and glamorous New York aristocrat who spent years […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Foreign Service, Humorous Tagged , , |
Jesse Helms: The Senator Who Just Said No

Jesse Alexander Helms, a five-term Republican Senator (1973- 2003) from North Carolina, was known not only for his conservative beliefs but for the lengths he would go in support of them. A proponent of the conservative resurgence movement in the 1970s, Helms cherished his nickname: “Senator No,” granted for his obstructionist tendencies. As a member […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Cold War, East Asia and Pacific, Europe, Foreign Service, Military, Public Diplomacy, Russia/Soviet Union, South Central Asia, Western Hemisphere Tagged , , , |
George Shultz: “Your Country is the United States”

George P. Shultz was Secretary of State for President Reagan from 1982 to 1989, the longest such tenure since Dean Rusk in the 1960s. As Secretary, Shultz resolved the pipeline sanctions problem between Western Germany and the Soviet Union, worked to maintain allied unity amid anti-nuclear demonstrations in 1983, persuaded President Reagan to dialogue with […]

Joseph Nye — Is the American Century Over?

In April 2016, ADST gave its Cyrus R. Vance Award to Dr. Joseph Nye. Named in honor of one of our most treasured career diplomats and former Secretary of State, this award recognizes outstanding achievement in advancing the study of U.S. diplomacy. Joseph Nye has been the preeminent thought leader on the issue of power […]