Search Results for persian gulf

Raymond Hare: Our Man in Cairo during WWII

Egypt and the Suez Canal became a point of global strategic interest during WWII because of the quick access the waterway could provide to Middle East oil, raw materials from Asia, and– for the British Empire particularly– a connection to its distant territories. Britain, as the first state to launch a completely mechanized military, was particularly […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Espionage, Europe, Middle East, Military, Post-Colonialism, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged , , |
The Long, Incomplete Road for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty

The movement to limit or even prohibit the testing of nuclear weapons has been around almost since the dawn of the nuclear age itself. Concern over harming the environment and causing widespread damage to human life led to the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963 and the 1974 Threshold Test Ban Treaty, which limited underground […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Military Tagged , , , |
Getting on the Seoul Train — The 1988 Summer Olympic Games

The Olympic Games represent the height of sporting diplomacy, with thousands of athletes transcending politics for two weeks as they represent their countries on the world stage. While the athletic spectacles entrance and amaze on television, without the behind-the-scenes political efforts and negotiations, there would be no Olympic Games. For many countries, hosting the Olympics […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, East Asia and Pacific, Foreign Service Tagged , , |
Towering Infernos – The Kuwait Oil Fires

A 2010 Time Magazine article rated it as the third worst environmental catastrophe in history, right behind Chernobyl and Bhopal. As Operation Desert Storm drew to a close, with Kuwait liberated and the Iraqi Army all but destroyed, Saddam Hussein would not concede defeat. Like a cornered rat, he inflicted one more blow on Kuwait’s ecology and […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Middle East, Military Tagged , , |
A Bum Rap for April Glaspie — Saddam and the Start of the Iraq War

In the summer of 1990, concerns were growing that Saddam Hussein, who was massing troops near the border with Kuwait, was preparing an all-out invasion. U.S. Ambassador to Iraq April Glaspie met with Saddam Hussein on July 25, 1990 to convey the United States’ position. While she did not have a demarche from Washington, she reiterated […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Foreign Service, Middle East, Public Diplomacy, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , , |
North Korea Blows up South Korean Airliner

Someone once described the dissolution of the USSR as a typical Soviet divorce — you’re no longer married but you’re still forced to live in the same apartment. So it is with North and South Korea, which have had more than their share of animosity the past half century, which has, not surprisingly, affected the […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, East Asia and Pacific, Terrorism Tagged , |
The 1991 Iraq War – The Battle at the UN: The Gathering Storm

Although several resolutions were passed by the UN Security Council imposing sanctions on Iraq, they did not have the desired effect of forcing Saddam Hussein to order his military to stand down and withdraw from Iraq. Saddam, in an effort to rally Arab support for his position, said he would only withdraw from Kuwait if […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Middle East, Military, Public Diplomacy Tagged , |
An Opportunity Lost — The 1991 Iraqi Uprising

In the days following the decimation of the Iraqi Army during Operation Desert Storm, groups of Iraqi minorities, specifically the Shia in the south and the Kurds in the north, seized on the weakness of Saddam Hussein’s armed forces to try and overthrow the Iraqi Baathist regime that had oppressed  them for decades. At the […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Human Rights, Middle East, Military Tagged |
The Coup Against Iran’s Mohammad Mossadegh

Mohammad Mossadegh became Prime Minister of Iran in 1951 and was hugely popular for taking a stand against the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, a British-owned oil company that had made huge profits while paying Iran only 16% of its profits and often far less. His nationalization efforts led the British government to begin planning to remove him […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, Middle East, Military Tagged , , , |
Rolling Thunder: Behind the Fog of War

The call by South Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyễn Khánh on July 19, 1964 to expand the Vietnam conflict led to an operation of gradual and sustained U.S. aerial bombardment of North Vietnam known as Operation Rolling Thunder. The mission was meant to boost the morale of the Saigon regime; force North Vietnam to cease support […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Military, South Central Asia Tagged |