Search Results for pakistan

The “Blood Telegram” That Angered Henry Kissinger: Violence in East Pakistan/Bangladesh

Shortly after joining USAID in 1969, Desaix “Terry” Meyers found himself witnessing both the aftermath of a major natural disaster, and the devastating levels of sectarian violence that followed in East Pakistan in the early 1970s. After a cyclone hit Pakistan in the fall of 1970, killing over 500,000 people, a famine ensued. This particular […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History
Brass Tacks and Kashmir: India-Pakistan Military Crises in the 1980s

A crisis between India and Pakistan erupted between November 1986 and March 1987 after India launched the largest-ever military exercise in the subcontinent, called Operation Brass Tacks. The exercise took place in the desert area of Rajasthan, a few hundred miles from the Pakistani border, and included nine infantry, three mechanized, three armored and one […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Military, Post-Colonialism, South Central Asia Tagged |
India and Pakistan on the Brink: The 1998 Nuclear Tests

In May 1998, India conducted its first nuclear bomb tests since 1974 at the Indian Army Pokhran Test Range. Known as Pokhran-II, the tests involved five detonations and were followed by Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee declaring India a full nuclear state. India’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) had come to power in the 1998 elections […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Military, South Central Asia Tagged , |
Kashmir and the 1965 Indo-Pakistani War

In the summer of 1965, India and Pakistan returned to the battlefields of Kashmir in a renewed attempt to establish their respective claims over the disputed, fertile region. On August 5th, more than 25,000 Pakistani soldiers, disguised as Kashmiris, infiltrated the area, mingling with their Muslim coreligionists and encouraging insurgency. Indian forces responded violently, launching […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Consular, Military, South Central Asia Tagged |
Establishing Ties with Pakistan — 1947

It was the end of one era and the beginning of another. In August 1947 the British Empire, which had ruled the Indian subcontinent as part of the Raj since the mid-19th century, granted independence to the India and the Islamic Republic of Pakistan. The Muslim League, which arose in the 1930s in order to […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Humorous, South Central Asia Tagged |
“Two Men, One Grave” — The Execution of Pakistan’s Ali Bhutto

Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, founder of Pakistan People’s Party (PPP), served as president of Pakistan in the 1970s.  By 1977, opposition against Bhutto and the PPP had grown due to incidents of repression, corruption, and alleged election fraud. Violence escalated across Pakistan, and Bhutto was overthrown by his army chief, General Zia-ul-Haq. Bhutto was put on […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Human Rights, South Central Asia
Bangladesh and Pakistan

Back to Diplomats and Diplomacy Bangladesh and Pakistan: Flirting with Failure in South Asia “The clarity of Milam’s writing, the comprehensiveness of his coverage, and the underlying terms of his argument, make this book essential reading for anyone with an interest in South Asian politics. Indeed, as a teaching tool this book is simply indispensable.” […]

A “Very Japanese” Arrangement to Dismantle a Soviet MIG-25

On September 6, 1976 a MIG-25 (foxbat), the most advanced Soviet fighter jet at the time, landed at Hokadote Airport in Hokkaido, Japan. Pilot Viktor Belenko emerged waving a pistol in the air and requested asylum in the United States.  Washington promptly approved Belenko’s asylum request and asked young diplomat Nicholas Platt to handle his […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History
Cold War Cover Stories: The U-2 Incident

On May 1, 1960, at the height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union brought down an American U-2 spy plane piloted by Francis Gary Powers.  The U.S. government’s first reaction was to construct a believable cover story to conceal its program of high-altitude surveillance missions over the Soviet Union. Powers began his flight from […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History
You Know a Coup is Coming but No One will Listen: Sudan 1964

Sudan’s long history has been riddled with internal conflict. The United Kingdom and Egypt controlled Sudan for the first half of the twentieth century, then agreed to cede it self-government in 1953. In December 1955, the premier of Sudan declared unilateral independence. The newly independent Republic swiftly fell into a pattern of civil wars, coups […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, Espionage, Foreign Service, Military, Post-Colonialism, Public Diplomacy Tagged , , , , , |