Search Results for assassination

Duty and Danger: A Diplomatic Spouse Targeted for Assassination in Algeria

When they learned they were marked for assassination, Parvaneh Limbert and her husband John — the political section chief at the U.S. Embassy Algiers — had to act quickly and quietly.  They hurried out of the country, surprising family and friends back home, and stayed in the United States until the would-be killers were arrested […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History
Indira Gandhi’s Assassination and the Anti-Sikh Riots, October 1984

Indira Gandhi was one of the most powerful women of the 20th Century, whose initial rise to power in 1966 was supported by those who labored under the mistaken belief that she would be a timid leader who could be easily manipulated. Quite the contrary, her tenure was marked by ruthless politics and the centralization […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Human Rights, South Central Asia Tagged , , |
Reap the Whirlwind — The Assassination of Rajiv Gandhi

Rajiv Gandhi, son of India’s long-time Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, had no intention of entering politics like the rest of his family, but as heir to the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty, such a step was almost pre-ordained. Rajiv Gandhi became India’s seventh Prime Minister on October 31, 1984 just hours after his mother was assassinated by two of […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Military, South Central Asia, Terrorism, Women and Minority FSOs Tagged , , |
KAL 007: A Targeted Assassination?

On September 1, 1983, Korean Air Lines Flight 007 en route on its second leg from Anchorage, Alaska to Seoul, South Korea was shot down by a Soviet interceptor aircraft into the Sea of Japan when it deviated from its intended route into Soviet territory.  The total death toll of 269 passengers included the U.S. […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Cold War, East Asia and Pacific, Foreign Service, Humorous, Military, Russia/Soviet Union Tagged |
Al Haig and the Reagan Assassination Attempt — “I’m in charge here”

When President Ronald Reagan was shot on March 30, 1981, chaos ensued behind the scenes at the White House. With no real protocol in place for such a situation, everyone involved had to improvise and hope that everything would turn out right. In an attempt to keep everyone calm, Al Haig, Reagan’s Secretary of State, […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History Tagged , , , , |
“The First Terrorist Attack in the U.S.” – The Letelier-Moffitt Assassinations

After Augusto Pinochet led a coup d’état in Chile on September 11, 1973, taking power from the democratically elected President Salvador Allende, he exiled Allende’s Foreign Minister, Orlando Letelier. After Letelier sought asylum in the United States, Pinochet believed he was acting as an informant to the U.S. government. Consequently, he was targeted by the Pinochet […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Consular, Human Rights, Terrorism, Western Hemisphere Tagged , , , , |
The Shot Felt ‘Round the World — Reactions to the JFK Assassination

On November 22nd, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas while traveling with his wife in a presidential motorcade. The reactions and repercussions of the assassination are flawlessly expressed in an interview of Ambassador Brandon H. Grove, Jr.: “Much has been said about the shock and grief that followed not only in […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Africa, East Asia and Pacific, Europe, Middle East Tagged |
The Assassination of Anwar Sadat, Part II

As a result of Anwar Sadat’s growing authoritarianism and treatment of his opposition, tensions in Egypt began rising shortly after the Camp David Accords were signed. Regular Egyptians were unsatisfied with the treaty’s results in addition to the state of the economy. His own security people had become increasingly concerned, as Sadat did not like […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Middle East, Military, Terrorism Tagged , , , , |
The Assassination of Anwar Sadat, Part I

When Egyptian President Anwar El Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin signed the Camp David Accords along with President Jimmy Carter in September 1978, it was hailed as a major breakthrough, a hard-won compromise that was meant to bring peace to the region and serve as a building block for an Israeli-Palestinian Peace. However, […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Human Rights, Middle East, Military, Terrorism Tagged |
The Assassination of Ambassador John Gordon Mein, Guatemala, 1968

Eight U.S. Ambassadors have died while on duty, six of whom were killed in armed attacks. The most recent was Chris Stevens, who died during the September 11, 2012 attack on Benghazi. (The other two ambassadors died in airplane crashes.) On August 28, 1968, Ambassador John Gordon Mein became the first U.S. ambassador to be […]

Posted in A Moment in U.S. Diplomatic History, Terrorism, Western Hemisphere Tagged , |